Berea College - Other Founders Papers,ca. 1850-1940 (bulk 1850-1900)

Descriptive Summary

Title
Berea College - Other Founders Papers,ca. 1850-1940 (bulk 1850-1900)
Creator
Berea College
Extent
.8 lin. ft.
Subjects
Slavery -- Anti-slavery movements
Madison County, Kentucky -- Sawmills
Abolitionists -- Madison County, Kentucky
Finding Aid Author
Processed by: staff; machine-readable finding aid created by:M. Plarr
Repository
Berea College

Collection Overview

Biography / History
George Candee, an Oberlin graduate and an ordained minister, worked in Jackson County, Kentucky, but came to Berea, Kentucky to help establish the College in 1859. William E. Lincoln came from England to preach and teach. After becoming a member of the American Missionary Association, he taught in Berea from 1855 to 1857. John Gregg Hanson, a cousin of John Gregg Fee's from Bracken County, Kentucky, was a founder and an exile, returning in 1865 to serve as the secretary of the Board of Berea College, to teach, and to operate a sawmill in the town. His brother, Samuel, served as a trustee of the College. Otis B. Waters, another Oberlin graduate, succeeded Lincoln as teacher at the school from 1857 to 1859.
John Hamilton Rawlings, a resident of Madison County, Kentucky, and friend of Cassius M. Clay, helped Fee choose the land and construct his school. Thomas J. Renfro, another local resident and farmer, and James Scott Davis, a minister and brother-in-law of J. A. R. Rogers, were two other founders and exiles. Jacob Emerick was one of the original trustees, and W. W. Wheeler was a friend of Fee's who left Camp Nelson to come to Berea to assist Rogers in his teaching.
Scope and Content
This includes correspondence and clippings related to George Candee, William E. Lincoln, Otis B. Waters, John Gregg Hanson, Samuel Hanson, John Hamilton Rawlings, Thomas J. Renfro, Jacob Emerick, James Scott Davis, and W. W. Wheeler.
In addition to correspondence and clippings, photographs of several of the men and their families are included. The Candee letters include correspondence from Cassius M. Clay.
Folder list; guide.