Lambert Luten letters

Abstract

The Lambert Luten letters (1861-1865; 0.02 cubic feet, 14 items) comprise correspondence written by Lambert Luten, a Civil War Union solider, to his brother, Hiram, and his parents, Berteld and Gezinna Luten.

Descriptive Summary

Title
Lambert Luten letters
Creator
Luten, Lambert, 1837-1916
Extent
0.02 Cubic Feet
Subjects
Slavery, abolition, and emancipation
Soldiers -- Correspondence.
United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Correspondence.
Racism -- United States -- Public opinion
Military history.
United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865.
Arrangement
Collection is arranged chronologically.
Finding Aid Author
Ann Baillie, Lauren Farmer, Kristen Thornsberry, Faith VanMeter
Preferred Citation
2013ms0469 : Lambert Luten letters, 1861-1865, University of Kentucky Special Collections.
Repository
University of Kentucky

Collection Overview

Biography / History
Lambert Luten (1837-1916) was born in Vollenhove, Overijssel, Netherlands to Berteld and Gezinna Luten. In 1847, his family immigrated to the United States on the ship The Albatross, including his brother Hiram, and sister Albatrosia. They arrived in New York City on July 12, 1847 and moved to Grand Rapids, Michigan, shortly thereafter.
Luten served as a soldier in the Union Army during the American Civil War in Company B of the 1st Regiment, Engineers and Mechanics out of Michigan. He entered the army with the rank of Corporal and left service with the rank of Sergeant. Throughout his time in the military, he fought in the Battle of Stones River in Murfreesboro, Tenn., and was in Georgia during the time of General William Sherman's March. He was in Savannah, Ga., shortly after the Union Army captured the city.
Luten married Wilhelmina (Minnie) M. Hagens, who was born in Holland, on May 6, 1866, in Grand Rapids, Mich. They had five children: Bretell (b. 1867); Daniel Benjamin (b. 1869); Grace (b. 1873); John (b. 1876); and Alice (b. 1879). He worked as a farmer in Jamestown, Mich.
Luten died on April 22, 1916, in Grand Rapids of acute cystitis.
Resources
Hagens, Mark, "Stamboom Hagens-Bakker-Lambert Luten," genealogieonline, accessed December 9, 2014, http://www.genealogieonline.nl/en/stamboom-hagens-bakker/I909.php
The Library of Michigan; Michigan Death Records, 1897-1920; Rolls: 1-301; Roll Number: 226; Certificate Number Number: 621, accessed on December 9, 2014, www.ancestry.com
"Lambert Luten Civil War Letters," Kent County Michigan Genweb Project, accessed December 9, 2014, http://kent.migenweb.net/military/civilwar/CWletterse/lluten.html
Luten, Lambert, National Park Service Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Database, accessed December 9, 2014, http://www.nps.gov/civilwar/search-soldiers-detail.htm?soldierId=787BC2B4-DC7A-DF11-BF36-B8AC6F5D926A
"Michigan Marriages, 1851-1875," Works Progress Administration Indexes to Michigan County Vital Records, Michigan State Library.
New York, New York. Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, NY, 1820-1897. M237, National Archives, Washington, D.C.,
Year: 1880; Census Place: Jamestown, Ottawa, Michigan; Roll: 601; Family History Film: 1254601; Page: 563A; Enumeration District: 247; Image: 0327. Accessed on January 6, 2015, www.ancestry.com
Scope and Content
The Lambert Luten letters (1861-1865; 0.02 cubic feet, 14 items) comprise correspondence written by Lambert Luten, a Civil War Union solider, to his brother, Hiram, and his parents, Berteld and Gezinna Luten. Lambert Luten sent the letters from Tennessee, Alabama, Kentucky, Georgia, and Washington, D.C., and include Lambert Luten's thoughts on food and supply shortages, repairing railroads, disease and health care, religion, camp life, slavery, and the Emancipation Proclamation. He also describes Civil War troop movements, activities, and officers, such as General Alexander McDowell McCook, the Battle of Stones River (Murfeesboro, Tenn.), General William Sherman's movement through Georgia, and the capture of Savannah, Ga. Two of the letters addressed to his parents are written in Dutch.

Restrictions on Access and Use

Conditions Governing Access
Conditions Governing Access Collection is open to researchers by appointment.
Use Restrictions
Property rights reside with the University of Kentucky. The University of Kentucky holds the copyright for materials created in the course of business by University of Kentucky employees. Copyright for all other materials has not been assigned to the University of Kentucky. For information about permission to reproduce or publish, please contact Special Collections.

Contents of the Collection

To Hiram Luten and Barteld and Gezinna Luten , 1861 November 12

  • Box MS-27, folder 1
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To Hiram Luten, 1862 January 16

  • Box MS-27, folder 1
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To Hiram Luten , 1862 April

  • Box MS-27, folder 1
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To Miney Hagens, 1862 June 19

  • Box MS-27, folder 1
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To Hiram Luten, 1862 September 16

  • Box MS-27, folder 1
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To Hiram Luten, 1862 October 19

  • Box MS-27, folder 1
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To Hiram Luten, 1863 January 13

  • Box MS-27, folder 1
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To Hiram Luten, 1863 February 11

  • Box MS-27, folder 1
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To Hiram Luten, 1864 August 24

  • Box MS-27, folder 1
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To Hiram Luten, 1864 October 27

  • Box MS-27, folder 1
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To Hiram Luten, 1864 December 27

  • Box MS-27, folder 1
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To Hiram Luten, 1865 May 25

  • Box MS-27, folder 1
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To Barteld and Gezinna Luten, 1865 June 15

  • Box MS-27, folder 1
Letter was translated by University of Kentucky Latin professor Dr. Jan-Piet Knijff in December 2014. Translation included in folder. This letter speaks of general troop movements from Washington to Parkersburg, West Virginia and then to Louisville, Kentucky. Lambert describes an unhappiness among the soldiers who are eager to return to civilian life. Toward the end of the letter he says he has been restored as sargeant, and that many of their travels take place along the Ohio River, where they are greeted by the waving of flags and handkerchiefs in the hands of man and women and children.
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To Barteld and Gezinna Luten , 1865 August 15

  • Box MS-27, folder 1
Letter was translated by University of Kentucky Latin professor Dr. Jan-Piet Knijff in December 2014. Translation included in folder. This letter discusses the weather and domestic issues, such as growing seasons for berries and melons and produce prices. Potatoes are 200 per bush[el]. In the second paragraph, he refers to a black man who has been shot and killed. About the shooting of that negro, I cannot say whether the murderer has been arrested or not. The guards went after him but are not in a hurry to catch him. There is much hatred against the negroes and there are few who defend the case of justice; yet if there are those who dare to do so, then 'the sails are always soon taken down again.' Luten finishes the letter referring to a fellow soldier who is ill, saying that the soldiers from Michigan who were on leave have all returned except for one who is sick.
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Researchers are required to have an SCRC Researcher Account in order to request or order digital copies of materials. Research Account set-up and use instructions can be found at: http://libguides.uky.edu/SCRCaccount

If you are visiting the Breckinridge Research Room, please request materials at least 48 business hours in advance of your arrival.

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