Eleanor Breckinridge Chalkley manuscript, 1982

Abstract

This collection is a typescript copy of Eleanor Breckinridge Chalkley's manuscript autobiography, "Magic Casements," written during the 1940's and published by the Kentucky Historical Society. The writings comments on 19th century social life in Lexington, Kentucky, on Breckinridge family matters, on Washington, D.C. in the 1880's and 1890's, and on important historical figures. The Breckinridge family were prominent political and civic leaders in Kentucky.

Descriptive Summary

Title
Eleanor Breckinridge Chalkley manuscript, 1982
Creator
Chalkley, Eleanor Breckinridge
Extent
1 v. ; 262 p.; 28 cm.
Subjects
Chalkley, Eleanor Breckinridge, b. 1861 -- Manuscripts
Breckinridge family
Lexington (Ky.) -- Social life and customs -- 19th century
Washington (D.C.) -- Social life and customs -- 19th century
Kentucky Historical Society
Arrangement
Original order maintained
Finding Aid Author
Processed and cataloged by Lori O'Connor; machine-readable finding aid created by Margie Plarr
Repository
Kentucky Historical Society

Collection Overview

Biography / History
Eleanor Breckinridge Chalkley was born in Lexington, Kentucky, in 1861 to Kentucky congressman W.C.P. Breckinridge and Issa Desha Breckinridge. Her sisters and brothers were Sophonisba Breckinridge, a social welfare reformer; Desha Breckinridge, newspaper editor and Progressive Era leader; Robert J. Breckinridge, businessman; and Curry Desha Breckinridge, a reforming nurse who died in 1918. She married Lyman Chalkley, judge, law professor, dean, and author. Her memoir, "Magic Casements," sometime in the 1940's and was later published by the Kentucky Historical Society in 1982.
Scope and Content
This collection is a typescript copy of Eleanor Breckinridge Chalkley's manuscript autobiography, "Magic Casements." The book was published by the Kentucky Historical Society in 1982. The introduction was written by James C. Klotter. Chalkley comments on 19th century social life in Lexington, Kentucky, on Breckinridge family matters, on Washington, D.C. in the 1880's and 1890's, and on important historical figures.