Wade Hall Collection of American Letters: Lewis family correspondence

Abstract

The Wade Hall Collection of American Letters: Lewis family correspondence (dated 1950-1952; 2.25 cubic feet; 5 boxes) comprises 490 letters and enclosures written and sent by Lewis brothers Marvin, Raymond, and William primarily to their mother, Mrs. Willie Belle Lewis of Coxs Creek, Kentucky, during their service in the United States Army in the Korean War, dated October 1950 to August 1952.

Descriptive Summary

Title
Wade Hall Collection of American Letters: Lewis family correspondence
Date
1950-1952
Extent
2.25 Cubic Feet
Subjects
Families of military personnel--United States
Families--Kentucky--History--20th century
Farm life--Kentucky--Nelson County--Anecdotes
Korean War, 1950-1953--Personal narratives, American
Letters.
Postage stamps
Rural families--Kentucky.
Arrangement
Collection is arranged into series by creator.
Finding Aid Author
Finding aid prepared by Processed by Jeffrey Witt under the direction of Ruth E. Bryan, Director of Archives
Preferred Citation
2009ms132.0001: [identification of item], Wade Hall Collection of American Letters: Lewis family correspondence, 1950-1952, University of Kentucky Special Collections.
Repository
University of Kentucky

Collection Overview

Biography / History
The Lewis family lived in Taylorsville, Spencer County, Kentucky, from at least 1940 to January 1951, when they moved to Coxs Creek, Nelson County, Kentucky. Mother Willie B. Ulery Lewis (1909-1993) and father Richard Lewis (1902-1979), both originally from Spencer County, Kentucky (Willie from Little Mountain and Richard from Waterford), had five children: Marvin R. (1927-2011), William S. (b. ca. 1930), Raymond T. (b. 1932), Howard G. Jack (1933-1984), and Mary B. (b. 1936). Richard was a farmer and a construction worker.
Three Lewis sons served in the military during the Korean War. Oldest son Marvin was in the U.S. Army at least by September 1950. Third son Raymond followed, going into service in March 1951. Second son William was drafted in May 1951. Daughter Mary married J.T. (surname unknown) in 1951. William married Catherine (surname unknown) in early summer 1951, and son Raymond married Anna Hardin in June 1952. Fourth son Howard was a farmer and a milk truck driver in Coxs Creek and was around 17 years of age during the period covered by the collection.
After the war, Marvin owned and operated a construction company, Lewis Construction, and was a member of Riverview Baptist Church in Coxs Creek. He had two sons, Timothy D. (who predeceased his father) and Michael. At the time of Marvin’s death on July 21, 2011, Raymond, William, and Mary were still living. Howard had died on February 25, 1984.
American Letters collector Wade Hall is a native of Union Springs, Alabama. Since 1962, he has lived in Louisville, where he has taught English and chaired the English and Humanities/Arts programs at Kentucky Southern College and Bellarmine University. He has also taught at the University of Illinois and the University of Florida. He holds degrees from Troy State University (B.S.), the University of Alabama (M. A.), and the University of Illinois (Ph.D.). He served for two years in the U.S. Army in the mid-fifties. Dr. Hall is the author of books, monographs, articles, plays, and reviews relating to Kentucky, Alabama, and Southern history and literature. His most recent books include A Visit with Harlan Hubbard; High Upon a Hill: A History of Bellarmine College; A Song in Native Pastures: Randy Atcher’s Life in Country Music; and Waters of Life from Conecuh Ridge.
Scope and Content
The Wade Hall Collection of American Letters: Lewis family correspondence (dated 1950-1952; 2.25 cubic feet; 5 boxes) comprises 490 letters and enclosures written and sent by Lewis brothers Marvin, Raymond, and William primarily to their mother, Mrs. Willie Belle Lewis of Coxs Creek, Kentucky, during their service in the United States Army in the Korean War. Other letters and enclosures received by Mrs. Lewis came from the brothers' friends Acie Lee Moore, and John and Glen Bell as well as from girlfriends/wives Anna Hardin/Lewis and Catherine Lewis. The collection also includes letters from extended Lewis family members and other friends of the brothers. Several of the letters are addressed to Howard (nicknamed Jake or Moose) Lewis, the one brother of the four not in the military. There is one letter from sister Mary Lewis (Dec. 14, 1950). The father, Richard Lewis--illiterate according to U.S. census records--is not represented.
The letters cover the time period from each brothers' initial indoctrination into military life to their training and finally their deployments--Marvin and Raymond to Korea and William to Hawaii. Letter topics concentrate on the family's farm in Coxs Creek, Kentucky, and the goings-on of family and friends in and around that area. Letters concerning military life are generally restricted to training, duties, and camp life and are limited in documenting the brothers' military activities. Their assigned military units are noted in the return addresses (when present) on the envelopes. The collection overall provides a social history of a rural farming family, especially the cycle of planting and harvesting crops; a window into the interests and concerns of the local young men; and reveals a family conversing together, highlighted by three sons serving in the United States military.
The Lewis Family Papers is part of the Wade Hall Collection of American letters, which includes correspondence and diaries from all over North America covering the time period of the Civil to Korean Wars. The materials were collected by Wade Hall and document everyday men and women.

Restrictions on Access and Use

Conditions Governing Access
Conditions Governing Access note Collection is open to researchers by appointment.
Use Restrictions
Property rights reside with the University of Kentucky. The University of Kentucky holds the copyright for materials created in the course of business by University of Kentucky employees. Copyright for all other materials has not been assigned to the University of Kentucky. For information about permission to reproduce or publish, please contact Special Collections.

Contents of the Collection

Marvin Lewis (brother), 1950 Sept.-1952 Aug.

Primarily 148 letters and 36 enclosures written by Marvin Lewis to family members at home in Coxs Creek, Ky., during his United States Army service in the Korean War, September 1950-August 1952. Also includes six letters written to Marvin by family members in July 1952 and enclosures received with the letters. Arranged in two subseries, Correspondence and Enclosures.

Correspondence, 1950 Sept.-1951 Sept.

  • Box 166, Folder 1-8
  • Box 165, Folder 1-10
Comprises 148 letters written by Marvin Lewis, age 23-24, dated September 1950 to August 1952 and spanning from Marvin's initial letter home upon entering service through his training, deployment in Korea, and return from Korea. Marvin served in an engineering battalion. The majority of the letters are from Marvin with occasional letters written to Marvin from his mother, sister, and sister-in-law, particularly during July 1952 when he was most likely traveling back from Korea. Locations from which the letters were posted are Fort Knox (Ky.); Fort Myer (Va.); Fort Belvoir (Va.); Camp Stoneman (Pittsburg, Calif.); Post Master San Francisco, Calif.; Japan; and South Korea (Kumbwa and Chorwon). The returned letters are from Coxs Creek, Ky. Common themes throughout the letters from both the United States and Korea are a desire to hear from family; Marvin and his brothers' military service; the family farm's yearly cycle of planting and harvesting, with occasional comments and comparisons about the current weather where Marvin was stationed and home; and Marvin's use and eventual mastery of a new camera(s). Also throughout, Marvin reassures his family that he is fine, and they should not worry. He focuses less on his hardships and more on his concern for home and family. Military allotments (in the Enclosures Subseries) show that Marvin sent a significant portion of his pay to his parents, highlighting his family's dependency on him, even in the service. The letters from the military camps in the U.S. (September 1950 to August 1951) include limited references to military life and training, for example, rifle training, marches, inspections, and weekend passes and leaves. Camp topics include the barracks, a hospital stay for measles (March 1951); and visits to Raymond Lewis, Acie Lee Moore (family friend) from March 1951 to July 1951; and Washington, D.C. The letters from Korea (September 1951 to August 1952) include descriptions of his journey there from the United States; his daily work driving D7 and D4 bulldozers as part of the 2nd Engineering Battalion of the 2nd Infantry Division; the bulldozers' constant breakdown; the time left in his deployment; and coming home. Arranged in chronological order. Envelopes were retained to document military stationery, location, and postmark. Each letter and envelope is housed in a paper sleeve.
To top

Enclosures, 1950 Nov.-1952 June

Comprises 36 enclosures received with Marvin Lewis' letters and includes menus; Korean and Japanese money; a marksmanship badge; newsletters and bulletins; and military pay allotments, orders, and communications. None of Marvin's letters refer to an enclosure. They thus appear to have been sent for general information and/or Marvin considered the enclosures to be self-explanatory. The date of the letter that included each enclosure is written on each item or on the item's sleeve. Each letter that included an enclosure is labeled [enclosure]. Arranged in alphabetical order by type of enclosure.

Currency: South Korean and Japanese bills and coins, 1951-1952

  • Box 166, Folder 9
Comprises five 1000 WON bills issued by The Bank of Korea; eight silver coins with flower burst design, believed to be Japanese; Japanese paper currency issued by Nippon Ginko (Bank of Japan) in 10, 50, 100, 500, and 1000 Yen denominations; and a Yen to Dollar conversion chart.
To top

Dinner menus and Ruler of the 180th Meridian International Dateline certificate, 1950 Nov.-1952 Jan.

  • Box 166, Folder 10
Comprises Thanksgiving Menu 1950 for Troop Commander's Dinner aboard the USNS General Nelson M. Walker, including the roster of Provisional Company M, 3rd Infantry, Fort Myer; and menus from Thanksgiving and New Year, 1951 and 1952 respectively, with a message from Major General Robert Young and a holiday prayer. Also includes a Certificate of the Domain of the Golden Dragon, signifying the passage of the 180-degree longitude line (International Date Line) by the naval troop transport General Nelson M. Walker.
To top

Marksmanship medal: B.A.R., carbine and rifle, 1951

  • Box 166, Folder 11
Comprises Expert Marksmanship Qualification Badge with Rifle, B.A.R., and Carbine clasps.
To top

Military orders, citations, and allotments, 1950 Sept.-1951 Aug.

  • Box 166, Folder 12
Comprises two pay allotments authorizing payments to father Richard Lewis and a Dependency Certificate (February and July 1951); five military orders, concerning leaves and assignments of Marvin Lewis and fellow soldiers (Sept 1950, Jan 1951-Feb. 1951, and July 1951); letter of commendation from Major Gen. Robert Young and Lt. Col. R. Love to Second Engineer Combat Battalion (October 15, 1951); and a letter from the Department of the Army addressing cost reduction and waste elimination, signed by Sec. of the Army Frank Pace, Jr., and commander of Far East Command, General Matthew Ridgeway (August 13, 1951).
To top

Newsletters and bulletins: The Warrior, The Fort Myer Post, U.S. Army Field Church Services bulletin, and Pacific Stars and Stripes clipping, 1950 Dec.-1952 June

  • Box 166, Folder 13
Comprises 13 pieces of printed material: The Fort Myer Post (Dec. 15, 1950 and Jan. 19, 1951), the local base newsletter, reporting local events, base news, its companies, WAC branch, tidbits, and sporting competitions between Army bases and nearby colleges; The Warrior (Oct. 10, 1951, to Mar. 6, 1952), the Second Division newsletter issued to soldiers in the field and including military and political news, the peace talks, news hi-lights or at a glance from around the world, and sports; Church Field Service and Communion Service bulletins (Feb. 24, 1952, to March 1952).
To top

Valentine cards (to Raymond), 1951 Feb.

  • Box 166, Folder 14
Comprises three cards enclosed with Marvin's letter dated Feb. 19, 1951, addressed to Raymond.
To top

Raymond Lewis (brother), 1951 Oct.-1952 Aug.

Primarily 157 letters written by Raymond Lewis to family members at home in Coxs Creek Ky., during his United States Army service during the Korean War, dated March 1951 to August 1952. Also included are letters written by Anna Hardin/Lewis addressed to Raymond Lewis and enclosures received with the letters. Series is arranged in two subseries, Letters and Enclosures.

Letters, 1951 March-1952 Aug.

  • Box 168, Folder 1-9
  • Box 167, Folder 1-9
Comprises 157 letters written by Raymond Lewis, believed to be 19 years of age during the bulk of his letter writing. The letters span Raymond's initial entry into military service in March 1951, his training, and deployment to Korea. The letters end in August 1952 with Raymond still in Korea. Raymond Lewis entered service with family friend, Acie Lee Moore, and initially (Spring and Summer 1951), was in close contact with nearby-stationed brother, Marvin Lewis. The majority of Raymond's letters are addressed to his mother or younger brother Howard Lewis, commonly referred to as Jack. Locations from which the letters originate are Fort Meade (Md.); Camp Pickett (now Fort Pickett, Va.); Fort Huachuca (Ariz.); Camp Walters Air Force Base (AFB, Tex.); Postmaster San Francisco, Calif.; Yokohama, Japan; and South Korea. Raymond's letters constitute the largest voice in the collection and are the most detailed, both in terms of the family relationships in Coxs Creek as well as in military life. Common topics in the letters include the daily farming cycle of the family's life in Coxs Creek and Raymond's relationship with his girlfriend and eventual wife Anna Hardin (who began signing her letters Mrs. Raymond Lewis in June 1952). Their on and off relationship is openly discussed by Raymond with his mother, Willie Lewis, throughout the entirety of the correspondence. The letters directly addressed to Jack Lewis focus on work (both of theirs), girls, and his prospect of military service. Military topics in Raymond's letters include training activities, the amount of Kentucky boys he recognized (March 1951), camp surroundings, and rumors of assignments and deployments. Like his brother, Marvin Lewis, Raymond served in an engineer unit driving trucks and bulldozers. In addition to these general comments, Raymond routinely writes about having/needing a car or motorcycle and about money, either back pay, credited debt, loaning money, or sending and requesting money from home. These latter topics are particularly prevalent during Raymond's time at Fort Huachuca (July 1951-January 1952) and Walters AFB (February 1952-May 1952). Other topics include listening to the radio (programs sporadically mentioned), the abundance of pictures taken and requested, and short-lived hobbies, such as owning a guitar while stationed at Fort Huachuca. Arranged in chronological order. Envelopes were retained to document military stationary, location, and postmark. Each letter and envelope is housed in a paper sleeve.
To top

Enclosures, 1951 Mar.-1952 Jan.

Comprises nine enclosures received with Raymond Lewis' letters and includes film negatives, typed general orders (date unknown), a newsletter, and a magazine clipping. The date of the letter that included each enclosure is written on each item or on the item's sleeve. Each letter that included an enclosure is labeled [enclosure]. Arranged in alphabetical order by type of enclosure.

General orders; The Chapel Call newsletter; a white ribbon; clipping re: Statler Hotel and 1951 Ford, 1951 Mar.-1952 Jan.

  • Box 168, Folder 10
Comprises General Duty Orders (guard duty), undated; Camp Pickett The Chapel Call, Vol. 1-No. 3, a newsletter published by Camp Pickett's chaplains (March 1951); an untitled magazine page displaying an advertisement for Statler Hotels on one side and an article concerning 11 attempts and the killing of Herb Noble, highlighted by a picture of a 1951 Ford (Spring-Summer 1951); and a white ribbon tied into bow (no context).
To top

Negatives, 1951 Apr.-1951 Sept.

  • Box 168, Folder 11
Five film negatives taken during training in April and September 1951, all posed portraits.
To top

William Lewis (brother) and Catherine Lewis (girlfriend/wife), 1951 May-1952 Aug.

Primarily 60 letters written by William Lewis and his wife, Catherine Lewis to family members at home in Coxs Creek, Ky., during his United States Army service during the Korean War, dated from May 1951 to August 1952. Also included are enclosures received with the letters. Series is arranged in two subseries, Letters and Enclosures.

Letters, 1951 May-1952 Aug.

  • Box 169, Folder 1-6
  • Box 168, Folder 12-17
Comprises 60 letters written by William Lewis, 22 years of age as of September 14, 1951 (source: letter from Raymond Lewis to Mrs. Lewis, Sept. 14, 1951). Believed to be the only brother drafted into service and the last of the three brothers to enter, William's letters span from his initial entry into the Armed Services in May 1951, through his training and non-combat deployment to Hawaii, until August 1952. The letters are addressed from William and Catherine Lewis (who married while he was on leave) to his mother, father, and brother Howard (also called Jack). Locations from which the letters originate are Fort Meade (Md.), Camp Gordon (Augusta, Ga.), Camp Stoneman (Pittsburg, Calif.), San Francisco Postmaster, and Hawaii. William Lewis' letters reflect his loneliness and misery more than any other voice in the collection. Other major topics in the letters include inquiries and comments about life in Coxs Creek and the receipt of letters from family (especially brothers Marvin and Raymond Lewis) and Kentucky acquaintances. However, when wife Catherine eventually comes to live with him (July 1951), her presence is the catalyst for a more upbeat tone in the letters, which focus on their idyllic home life as a married couple. William and Catherine were religiously centered. Their letters often mention church services, Bible verses, revivals, and teaching Sunday school. For a time, Catherine writes in place of William (most active from July 1951 to October 1951). William resumes the role of primary letter writer in Hawaii starting in November 1951 though the end of the letters in August 1952. William worked in the Signal Corps training as a message clerk and later in electrical power and maintenance. In Hawaii, William is assigned to a radio station (letter of December 6, 1951) with no threat of deployment to Korea. Concerning military life, William's letters reveal the monotony and his dissatisfaction with military work, mainly focused on his time in Hawaii (starting December 1951).
To top

Enclosures, 1951 July-1952 Aug.

Comprises eight enclosures received with William and Catherine Lewis' letters, including church bulletins and a photograph. Church bulletins are from Hill Baptist Church and First Baptist Church in Augusta, Ga., and Olivet Baptist Church in Honolulu, Hawaii. The photograph shows construction of Clarks Hill Dam, Ga. and S.C. (also called J. Strom Thurmond dam). The date of the letter that included each enclosure is written on each item or on the item's sleeve. Each letter that included an enclosure is labeled [enclosure]. Arranged in alphabetical order by type of enclosure.

Church bulletins: Hill Baptist (Ga.); First Baptist (Ga.); Olivet Baptist (Ha.)

  • Box 169, Folder 7
Church bulletins for William and Catherine's attendance at Hill Baptist Church in Augusta, Ga. (July 15, 1951), First Baptist Church of Augusta, Ga. (August 12 and 21, Sept. 9 and 24, and Oct. 10 1951 services), and Olivet Baptist Church in Honolulu, Hawaii. (August 31, 1952).
To top

Photograph: Clarks Hill Dam, S.C., 1951 July 21

  • Box 169, Folder 8
Photo of Clarks Hill Dam, S.C., taken July 21, 1951 during construction, prior to the power house.
To top

Brothers' friends' letters to Lewis family, 1951 Mar.-1952 Aug.

Primarily 44 letters written by friends of the Lewis brothers to the Lewis family, dated from March 1951 to August 1952. The letters include correspondence between Raymond Lewis' girlfriend and wife, Anna Hardin Lewis, to mother, Mrs. Willie Lewis. Also represented are letters from childhood friends and fellow soldiers Acie Lee Moore and John and Glen Bell (brothers) to Mrs. Willie Lewis. Arranged alphabetically by last name of letter writer. Envelopes were retained to document location and postmark when applicable. Each letter and envelope is housed in a paper sleeve.

Clyde Bell, 1952 June 30

  • Box 169, Folder 9
Letter addressed to Mrs. Lewis from Clyde Bell at Dobbins Air Force Base (Marietta, Ga.) and asking for Raymond Lewis' mailing address. Clyde is no relation to John or Glen Bell and served with Raymond in the same battalion in Arizona.
To top

John and Glen Bell, 1951 Dec.-1952 Aug.

  • Box 169, Folder 10
Comprises letters written by brothers John Bell and Glen Bell during their military service to the Lewis family and dated from December 1951 through August 1952. Locations from which the letters were written include Parris Island (Port Royal, S.C.); Camp Pendleton (Ca.); and Sampson Air Force Base (Ny.). Friends of the family, especially of the younger Lewis brothers, Raymond and Jack, John was drafted into the Marines as a tank mechanic and Glen served in the Air Force, attending Technical School. John's wife is Florence Ann Bell. The Bell brothers' letters are generally limited to hellos, inquiries about home, and the prospect of Jack Lewis getting drafted. John Bell's letter of December 22, 1951 includes a Christmas card. Glen's letters also include church topics. John Bell is referenced in letters and a newspaper article in Series V.
To top

Anna Hardin Lewis (Raymond's girlfriend/wife), 1951 Mar.-1952 Sept.

  • Box 169, Folder 11
Comprises letters written to Mrs. Willie Lewis, dated March 1951 to September 1952 from Louisville, Kentucky. In spite of her on-and-off relationship with Raymond (documented in both sets of letters), Anna is dedicated to Mrs. Lewis, referring to her as mother throughout the correspondence. Although there is no mention of their marriage, starting June 1952, Anna begins addressing her envelopes as Mrs. Raymond Lewis. This date coincides with a two to three week gap in Raymond's letters, during which he is believed to be on leave prior to his shipping out to Korea in July 1952. Marvin Lewis' letter to Anna of June 20, 1952, is addressed to Anna Lewis. Topics in Anna's letters include her health, her struggles and tribulations, and the well being of the Lewis family. A letter from Raymond to his mother (April 19, 1951) hints at the knowledge that Anna Hardin has been to some degree abused and has spent time in Michigan away from her family, although Anna's letters do not confirm this. Anna lives on her own in Louisville, often visiting Mrs. Lewis in Coxs Creek.
To top

Acie Lee Moore, 1951 Mar.-1952 Aug.

  • Box 169, Folder 12-13
Comprises letters written to Mr. and Mrs. Lewis and Jack/Howard Lewis during Acie Lee's training, deployment, and return to the United States, beginning in March 1951 through August 1952. Locations from which the letters were written include Fort Belvoir (Va.); Fort Lawton (Seattle, Wa.); San Francisco, Ca.; Yokohama, Japan; and Korea. Only one letter is from his tour of Korea, August 11, 1951. A friend of the family, especially of the younger Lewis brothers, Raymond and Jack, Acie Lee's letters in training and deployment focus on gossip from home, Jack's (also called Moose) endeavors, and women. Acie Lee's post-Korean letters (after August 1951) focus on his relationships and dating life and are usually addressed to Mrs. Lewis.
To top

Other letters and enclosures to Lewis family members, 1951 Oct.-1952 Sept.

Primarily 28 letters and postcards written by relatives or friends of the Lewis family and addressed to Mrs. Lewis and son, Howard ( Jack) Lewis, dated between October 1950 and September 1952. Also includes financial and humorous items related to Howard Lewis. Arranged in six folders by name of correspondent or by format. Envelopes were retained to document location and postmark when applicable. Each letter and envelope is housed in a paper sleeve.

Howard Jack Lewis (brother at home), 1951 Oct. and undated

  • Box 169, Folder 14
Youngest of the Lewis brothers, Howard has not yet entered military service. Repeated letter topics among Lewis family and friends include speculation about the possibility of his being drafted. Howard works on the family farm and also for a time has a full-time job as a truck driver, believed to be milk delivery. Folder includes Howard's Selective Service System Notice of Identification, a quarterly statement from River View Baptist Church in Coxs Creek, Ky. (church offerings/contributions) for the third quarter of 1951, and an unidentified comic tightwad drawing.
To top

Mrs. Lewis' family (addressed to Sis or Daughter), 1950 Nov.-1952 Sept.

  • Box 169, Folder 15
Primarily letters, cards, and postcards addressed to Mrs. Willie Lewis ( daughter) from her mother, Susie Ulery, of Jeffersontown, Ky., and dated November 1950 to September 1952. Other letters and postcards are addressed to Mrs. Willie Lewis as sis or sister. These letters shed further light into the family life of Mrs. Lewis.
To top

Other family and friends, 1950 Oct.-1952 Jan.

  • Box 169, Folder 16
Letters addressed to Mrs. Richard (Willie) Lewis from family from Lewis, Ulery, Hardin, and Redmond families dated October 1950 to January 16, 1952, and postmarked from Highland Park, Ky.; Buechel, Ky.; Taylorsville, Ky.; and Bremerton, Wash. Topics in the letters include the wellbeing of the Lewis family, inquiries into how the Lewis' boys are faring, and news from the writers' lives.
To top

William S. Doughten, Betty Crocker Magazine, 1952 Mar. 5

  • Box 169, Folder 17
Betty Crocker Magazine: Letter in reply to Mrs. Lewis with regard to Betty Croker: Magazine of the Air serviceman telephone conversations.
To top

Blank postcards: Virginia Union University (Richmond, Va.) and Duk Soo Palace (Seoul, Korea), undated

  • Box 169, Folder 18
Virginia Union University postcard likely purchased by Raymond Lewis when he was stationed in Camp Pickett (March 1951-early July 1951). Either Marvin or Raymond Lewis or Acie Lee Moore could have brought the Duk Soo Palace postcard to the U.S.
To top

Newspaper clippings: Nelson Co. (Ky.) draftees and Old Baldy (Korea) fight, 1952

  • Box 169, Folder 19
Two undated newspaper articles on reporting the fighting at Old Baldy, Chorwon Valley, Korea. It is believed that Marvin Lewis' or Acie Lee Moore's units might have been involved in the battle. (The Old Baldy battle took place from June 1952-March 1953). The third article lists the names of men from Nelson County, Ky., selected for pre-induction physical and examinations for the armed services. John Bell's name is listed (see Series IV). Publication year is not present.
To top

Revival cards: River View Baptist Church (family church in Ky.), undated

  • Box 169, Folder 20
Cards announce Troy Prince, evangelist, and Roy Mitchell, pastor and song leader (March 31-April 11 and August 20-31); and John W. Kurtz, preacher, and Denzel Dukes, song leader. The years are undetermined, but most likely the cards date from 1951 and/or 1952.
To top

Researchers are required to have an SCRC Researcher Account in order to request or order digital copies of materials. Research Account set-up and use instructions can be found at: http://libguides.uky.edu/SCRCaccount

If you are visiting the Breckinridge Research Room, please request materials at least 48 business hours in advance of your arrival.

For all other questions, contact us at: https://libraries.uky.edu/ContactSCRC.

Researchers are required to have an SCRC Researcher Account in order to request or order digital copies of materials. Research Account set-up and use instructions can be found at: http://libguides.uky.edu/SCRCaccount

If you are visiting the Breckinridge Research Room, please request materials at least 48 business hours in advance of your arrival.

For all other questions, contact us at: https://libraries.uky.edu/ContactSCRC.

Requests

No items have been requested.